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Combinatorial Games and Algorithmic Calculations Using Chess

Zhida Yin

Issaquah High School, Issaquah, 98027, WA, USA.

*Corresponding author: Zhida Yin

Published: November 29,2022 How to cite this paper

Abstract

Combinatorial games like chess and checkers are two-player strategy games like chess and checkers, containing simple moves that can result in many different variations. These variations have different strategic points to take note of, for example, the placement of the pieces. The abstract placement is the most important aspect of combinatorial games, as they mark the starting point for strategy. Games like chess have computer engines that calculate every single move and response to make a conclusion of the game’s result. The computer engine uses unsupervised learning to analyze games and spot mistakes made by the players. It starts off with zero knowledge and over the course of millions of games played, it started to become the most powerful “player” in the history of chess, though many highly skilled chess players can easily beat a computer at the highest difficulty. This is a deep dive into the mind of a chess computer, the ways it thinks, processing, eliminating bad moves, and concluding the move it wants to make.

KEYWORDS: Combinatorial games, Algorithmic calculations, Strategies

References

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How to cite this paper

Zhida Yin. Combinatorial Games and Algorithmic Calculations Using Chess. OA Journal of Computer Networking, 2022, 1(2), 33-37.


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